THE FOUR STEPS TO TRANSFORMING MATERNITY CARE
VisionBlueprintActionProgress

Vision

What does high quality maternity care look like? [read more]

Blueprint

How do we get there? [read more]

Action

Be part of the transformation [read more]

Progress

What efforts are already underway? [read more]

Latest news

News archive

From the TMC blog: Helping Pregnant Women Become Partners in Their Care

From the desk of: Maureen Corry

The quality of maternity care in our country needs improvement. While transforming the maternity care system will take time, there is progress to report.

In February, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) released a groundbreaking consensus statement on the overuse of cesarean. The statement confirms that the procedure is too often used in ways that do not improve maternal and child health outcomes.

[read the rest of this post » ]

Filed in Blog, New Reports and Resources on Mon., Apr 14, 2014

From the TMC blog: Listening to Mothers III survey shows moms deserve better in pregnancy and birth

We recently published the results of Listening to Mothers III, the third national U.S. survey of women’s pregnancy and birth experiences. As with previous Listening to Mothers surveys, the latest data show that risky procedures are overused, many beneficial practices are underused, and all too often women lack the support and knowledge required to effectively navigate their maternity care.

We’ve made it easier than ever for you share the survey findings to help improve policy, practice, research, and advocacy.

[read the rest of this post » ]

Filed in Blog, New Reports and Resources on Tue., May 28, 2013

From the TMC blog: The Leapfrog Hospital Survey now reports episiotomy rates

The Leapfrog Group, a patient safety organization comprised of employers and other purchasers of employee health coverage, has reported measures of maternity care safety for several years, most notably with their survey of hospital rates of early elective deliveries. This year’s Leapfrog Hospital Survey highlights hospital rates of episiotomy. The public can compare episiotomy rates within a city, state, or region. An episiotomy is a surgical cut to enlarge the vagina for vaginal birth. Evidence suggests that routine or frequent use of episiotomy does not benefit babies but increases mothers’ pain, reduces pelvic floor strength, and may predispose women to extensive tears that involve anal sphincter muscles. Despite the evidence, episiotomy rates remain high in some settings.

[read the rest of this post » ]

Filed in Blog, Hospitals and Health Systems, New Reports and Resources on Mon., Apr 1, 2013

From the TMC blog: Shared Decision Making in Maternity Care

Along with our partners at the Informed Medical Decisions Foundation, we are celebrating Shared Decision Making Month, and last week the spotlight was on maternity care. Maureen Corry was interviewed as part of a series on Shared Decision Making Along the Continuum of Care. Then she moderated a webinar about maternity care shared decision making with Kim Gregory, MD, MPH and Ob-Gyn and Vice Chair of Women’s Healthcare Quality and Performance Improvement at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles, Kate Chenok, Director at the Pacific Business Group on Health, and Kristen Oganowski, a mother, doula, and blogger at Birthing Beautiful Ideas.

[read the rest of this post » ]

Filed in Blog, Clinicians, Consumers on Mon., Mar 18, 2013

From the TMC blog: It’s Been 95 Years, Baby!: A Closer Look at Our First Decade

Childbirth Connection is celebrating our 95th birthday this year by featuring one decade of our work each month on the TMC Blog. This month we will feature our first decade – 1918-1927.

Childbirth Connection was founded in New York City as the Maternity Center Association (MCA) in 1918 to implement recommendations from a report on the poor health of women and infants around the time of birth. At the time there were no standards for maternity care, many women lacked access, and infant and maternal mortality rates were high.

By 1920, MCA had established 30 centers and substations throughout the city to ensure universal access to prenatal care and to teach the community about the value of such care. The nurses at the centers helped select the women needing hospital care and refer them to hospitals, and helped the women planning to give birth at home to make arrangements for adequate care. To coordinate this work, MCA created a standard record and a central clearinghouse for all maternity records “to prevent duplication in the maternity work throughout the bureau and to assign to the various agencies those patients reported to the clearing house as in need of prenatal supervision.”

[read the rest of this post » ]

Filed in 95 Years, Blog on Fri., Mar 1, 2013