Posts tagged with 'Utah'

In the Literature: At Intermountain, process improvement reduces inductions, cesareans, NICU admissions, and costs

As a result of process improvement efforts bolstered by robust information systems, the proportion of all inductions that lacked strong indications for clinical appropriateness fell from 28 percent to less than 2 percent. The project also resulted in decreases in both NICU admissions and cesareans, and Intermountain estimates that the elective induction protocol reduces health care costs in Utah by $50 million per year.

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Filed in Blueprint, Clinical audit, case review, or analysis of adverse events, Clinical controversies, Clinical practice guideline/policy change, Health information technology, Health information technology, In the Literature, Payment reform, Performance measurement, Performance measurement/reporting on Fri., Jul 29, 2011

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From the TMC blog: Charges for giving birth are all over the map. What’s the price tag in your state?

If you give birth in a Maryland hospital, your hospital will charge about $5500 if you have an uncomplicated vaginal birth and about $6800 if you have an uncomplicated cesarean section. Move just up the coast to New Jersey and triple or even quadruple those numbers. The hospital now charges more than $18,000 for the same vaginal birth and a whopping $26,000 for the same cesarean. Move to a state with a birth center, like California or Washington, and the facility charge drops to as low as $2000 for an uncomplicated vaginal birth.

How does your state measure up? Childbirth Connection has just posted Average Facility Labor and Birth Charges by Site and Method of Birth for the 35 states for which data are available.

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Filed in Blog, Costs - Charges - Value on Thu., Jul 14, 2011

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In the Literature: Intermountain Healthcare’s recurrent preterm birth consultation clinic is associated with improved care, outcomes

Intermountain Healthcare established a recurrent preterm birth prevention clinic in an effort to provide consistent, evidence-based medical care and education to women who have already experienced at least one prior spontaneous preterm birth and are at high risk for recurrent preterm birth. A retrospective cohort study evaluating the program found that referral to the clinic was associated with reduced likelihood of spontaneous preterm birth, longer gestation, and lower rates of neonatal morbidity.

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Filed in Blueprint, Care coordination, Clinical practice guideline/policy change, In the Literature, New care delivery model, Progress, Staffing/care coordination change on Tue., May 3, 2011

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